Yahoo! Joins Apple, Other Tech Companies, Abandons U.S. Chamber

Joining a growing list of major corporations that are upset with the U.S. Chamber’s pay-to-play model, where the U.S. Chamber’s brand is for-sale to the highest bidder, Yahoo! Has abandoned the U.S. Chamber citing the business lobby’s active work against their interests. According to Politico’s Morning Tech:

Yahoo has quietly left the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, MT has learned. For Yahoo’s part, a spokeswoman would only say to MT that the company "has memberships with numerous trade associations and belongs to a number of organizations that promote a free and fair marketplace which enable Yahoo! to innovate on behalf of our more than 700 million users. As our membership renewal time neared and we reviewed our membership, we decided not to renew."

 

Yahoo didn’t elaborate any further, and the Chamber said it does not comment on membership changes. But we know one thing for sure: The two didn’t see eye to eye on at least one issue. That’s the PROTECT IP Act, which the Chamber strongly supports and Yahoo greatly opposes. We’re following.

More than fifty local Chamber of Commerce's have quit the U.S. Chamber, citing their extreme and draconian positions on climate change, Wall Street and health care reform. In addition, nearly a dozen major corporations have abandoned or disavowed the U.S. Chamber for their radical positions and pay-to-play model. 

Just In

Whose opportunity does U.S. Chamber of Commerce President Tom Donohue talk about when he talks about opportunity?

The Chamber’s policies might give the largest corporations the opportunity to grow, but that is often not the same thing as growth and opportunity for the American people. After-tax corporate profits in the third quarter topped 11 percent of GDP for the first time since the records started in 1947. But everyday Americans aren’t doing so well, with real median household income declining 4.4 percent since 2009.

When the Chamber opposes increasing minimum wages to coincide with growth in productivity and the economy overall, one must ask whose growth and opportunity the Chamber is pushing for.